Third Quartile of Philosophy PhD Programs Ranked by Average Student Rating with Placement Rate and Student Comments

The last two weeks I have posted information about the top quartile and second quartile of philosophy PhD programs according to average student rating. This week I am covering the third quartile.

What is the difference between these quartiles? While there were two statistically significant differences between the top and second quartile (average student rating and permanent academic placement rate), placement rate is the same for the second and third quartiles (46%). The average student rating for the top quartile is 4.5 out of 5, for the second quartile is 4.1, and for the third quartile is 3.7.

Thus, in this blog post I collate updated information about 31 philosophy PhD programs in philosophy:

  • keywords (if 3+ participants chose the keyword),
  • average program ratings by past graduates and current students (if 5+ participants rated the program on that dimension),
  • job placement,
  • and public student comments (with identifying information removed).*

This includes roughly the third quartile of the full list of 123 programs and is ordered by average student rating. (Note that small differences in order should be treated with a grain of salt and the bottom of one quartile will be virtually indistinguishable from the top of the next.) There is a table with some of the information included in this blog post here: https://prezi.com/i/xlzuqydltzt6/. Programs excluded are those with no 2020/2021 graduates in the database and those with no placement page/dissertation records. All values that are above average by at least one standard deviation are bolded. See the last two research reports for details on methodology, participation, etc.

I plan to release the last blog post, on the 4th quartile, a week from today.

You can link to the post at: http://placementdata.com:8182/third-quartile-of-philosophy-phd-programs-ranked-by-average-student-rating-with-placement-rate-and-student-comments

*People/programs that wish to respond to material presented here can do so in the comments, below, or by reaching out to me directly. My current policy is to remove personally identifying information when possible in advance, but I will otherwise do so when notified by the affected parties.

60) Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Aesthetics, Analytic, Cognitive Science, Gender/Feminist, Language, Logic/Formal, Mind, Naturalist/Empirical, Pluralist

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.9 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 3.5 teaching preparation (satisfied); 3.7 research preparation (satisfied); 3.2 financial support (neutral); 3.7 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
134 total, 58 in permanent academic jobs, 9 in non-academic jobs (46% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
CUNY is a good program for students who can work independently, but mostly a bad program for students who need a lot of guidance and supervision. Many of the professors are very inconsistent about making time for graduate students, though they often give high quality feedback when they give any.
Excellent seminars given by faculty members, a broad offer of seminars and courses on different areas of philosophy, and a great diversity of interests among faculty members and PhD students.
Excessive focus on developing specialized expertise in AOS leaves students poorly prepared to address philosophy more broadly. Limited supervisorial oversight means students are largely working on their own - gaining little from being enrolled in the institution.
Funding is a significant stressor at CUNY. The structure of the program, in which most faculty are appointed to senior colleges dispersed through the City and not ordinarily at the Graduate Center, is a problem. There are excellent faculty, but many are distracted by other commitments and the exigencies of city life. The size of the program is a big advantage, both in terms of numbers of faculty and size of cohort. Many students find excellent peer support. But because of the size of the program, and the pressures for excellence, faculty often do not feel responsible for serving on committees or advising students working outside of their narrow areas.
I would not recommend anyone do a PhD in philosophy at this point.
large, diverse, distinguished faculty; lots of opportunities for teaching experience; embedded in a rich and active philosophical community
My experience working with faculty and having sufficient time and funding have been great, but I know that many others have not had the same experience. In particular, it is easy to get lost because of the size of the department and their are rumors of faculty that are quite difficult to work with or get advising from. I also know that my background contributes to making it easier for me to benefit in graduate school.
No junior faculty, inattentive advising, uneven student quality, too many masters students who distract the faculty.
Quality of instruction. Location.
The likelihood of a satisfying career in academic philosophy is so low that spending 4-8 years doing a PhD in this field is not a good use of time for most mortals.
This program gave the chance to be taught by and work with many of the foremost philosophers in the world. It also made a great difference to me that the Graduate Center, CUNY, is part of a public university. This materially affected my teaching opportunities and the range of exceptional fellow graduate students I had the chance to work with--from those who came from ivy league undergraduate institutions to those who had worked their way up from CUNY community to senior college and then to the graduate program, as well as older students and those who had worked outside academia for some time. This diversity of background made the program a much richer and philosophically stronger one. The teaching work I was able to do while in the program and the chance to work as a Writing Fellow within the CUNY system, transformed my pedagogy and was a huge advantage in getting my current permanent position in philosophy.

61) University of Maryland, College Park

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Aesthetics, Analytic, Cognitive Science, Ethics, Mind

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.9 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 4.3 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
43 total, 9 in permanent academic jobs, 9 in non-academic jobs (26% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
The primary reason was the academic environment, which was open and friendly. That is to say, faculty and graduate students would interact on a regular basis and discussing work with faculty and other graduate students was easy to do.

62) Vanderbilt University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Continental, Critical Theory, Ethics, Gender/Feminist, German, Historical, Pluralist, Political, Pragmatism, Race

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.9 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 3.4 teaching preparation (neutral); 4.0 research preparation (satisfied); 4.3 financial support (satisfied); 3.8 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
43 total, 24 in permanent academic jobs, 6 in non-academic jobs (65% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Excellent faculty. Strong devotion to students. Great location. Good track record of graduates going on to successful academic careers.
I had a very good experience at Vanderbilt. There was a thriving feminist philosophy community there, and broader departmental interest in social/political work from a variety of perspectives. Pluralism was encouraged, which I think is important, especially as philosophy as a discipline grows more diverse and begins to overcome the (supposed) analytic/continental split. From a practical perspective, I also thought Vanderbilt was a great choice because it was very well funded, and graduate students were much better supported than in many other programs. My only hesitation in recommending is that the department has undergone some significant changes since I left, and I am unsure of how much of the good I remember remains.
the faculty have changed substantially since I left but I know the program is still committed to a pluralistic education with most faculty emphasizing normative aspects of their fields and that makes for a great well-rounded education where people can talk to so many others in the discipline. the amount of teaching graduate students do also helps make people competitive on the job market (though apparently not for PhD granting programs for what I still take to be narrow-minded elitist problems in hiring)
The Vandy Phil department is extremely diverse and the program is comprehensive and high quality. The funding was extremely generous. Vanderbilt is beautiful and living in Nashville is fun. The department has a better than average placement record for tenure track positions.
Vanderbilt offers a tremendous background in the history of philosophy, encouraging students to obtain a broad range of expertise. This benefited me when looking for a position in the field because so many colleges today have smaller departments where professors must teach a variety of courses. Concentrating too much in a narrow part of philosophy would have kept me from receiving the job I currently have. I also enjoyed the faculty, and I felt that they genuinely cared about me and my education (as well as placing me once I finished).

63) Binghamton University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Applied, Continental, Critical Theory, Ethics, Gender/Feminist, Interdisciplinary, Political

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.9 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
32 total, 15 in permanent academic jobs, 5 in non-academic jobs (56% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Strong, diverse, and supportive faculty; inclusive and progressive departmental culture; good blend of continental and analytic philosophy; decent selection of graduate courses; significant support and prep for job seekers. Overall, this is a great department for those who want to do relevant work in contemporary social and political philosophy and ethics.
The program is very welcoming and has a remarkably diverse community (at least in terms of gender and ethnicity).

64) Purdue University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
African, Analytic, Continental, Critical Theory, Early Modern, Epistemology, Ethics, Historical, History and Philosophy of Science, Interdisciplinary, Metaphysics, Pragmatism

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.9 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 3.4 program climate (neutral)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
71 total, 25 in permanent academic jobs, 5 in non-academic jobs (38% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
broad philosophical education with strong background in the history of philosophy
Great instructors. I also loved the flexibility of the dual program. In terms of prospective students this is one of the only programs in the United States with a commitment to BOTH Continental and Analytic. You can get a good education in either specialization at Purdue. The program is a unicorn in that aspect, especially in terms that the faculty on both sides of the divide get along well.
I feel like I received an excellent education for the topics I was interested in. For a student who wanted more exposure to continental philosophy, the department may have been a bit too aggressive against such fields of study. I also felt that I could have been more closely mentored. Professors seemed to latch on to certain students and not others.
It depends on which faculty.
My program gave me plenty of teaching opportunities which really helped me on the job market. Purdue is a well-funded institution which means that you will be financially comfortable while going through the graduate program. The professors I worked with all had my best interest in mind. All of the faculty are highly regarded in their respective subjects.
My program no longer accepts new graduate students (there is not funding).
Philosophical pluralism among the members of the department and professional respect for differing standpoints with regard to religious faith.
Strong in history of philosophy. Program offers courses covering analytic, continental, and pragmatist traditions. Good placement record.
The most important single aspect of a graduate department is the fit a grad student has with their advisor. Because I was fortunate to have an excellent advisor and a rewarding working relationship with them, I am glad I went to Purdue. So I would recommend the program to a graduate student whose interests relevantly intersect with mine in this regard. The program is not sufficiently strong overall, however, to recommend without this kind of advisor fit, which is why I selected the qualification "somewhat".

65) Boston College

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Aesthetics, Ancient, Continental, Critical Theory, French, German, Historical, Medieval, Phenomenology

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.9 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 4.0 teaching preparation (satisfied); 3.1 research preparation (neutral); 3.2 financial support (neutral); 4.0 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
77 total, 39 in permanent academic jobs, 6 in non-academic jobs (55% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
-good variety of professors and course offerings -easy to find a director -good cohort of fellow students
bad environment for women and people of color; while professionalization efforts have improved, there was little support for going on the market; little to no mentoring of graduate students; extremely heavy teaching load with no meaningful teaching prep (PHD students begin teaching their own course at year two, never TA); administration not open to concerns of graduate students regarding gender-based harassment hostile environment
Boston College has one of the best philosophy programs in the country. Its excellence in the History of philosophy, the European/Continental tradition, metaphysics, epistemology is remarkable and the faculty is excellent.
Boston College is an excellent PhD program for history of philosophy, especially in Ancient and Medieval philosophy.
Boston College is an excellent program in Continental philosophy, and its professors do an excellent job of preparing grad students for the job market. This includes things like helping with networking at major philosophy conferences (like SPEP and the APA), helping with publication (introducing grad students to potential publishers, co-editing books with grad students, etc.), providing multiple years of teaching experience, and ensuring you have competency in the broad history of western philosophy, which helps you be able to teach a wider variety of courses. It is also a very helpful and friendly environment on the grad school level: graduate students have a culture of working together (study groups for comps, etc.) rather than of competition. I made a number of good friends when I was there that continue to to this day.
During my PhD studies, Boston College had the best Philosophy Lecturers in Phenomenology, Existential Philosophy, and Political Philosophy. The discussions around the Philosophy of the Body and Totalitarianism were very rich. Boston College is top ranked in Philosophy. I would definitely recommend its programs to Masters and PhD prospective students.
Great top- and junior-level professors; great mentoring; strong graduate student community.
Having the opportunity to use the Continental Phenomenology tradition and method to read, analyze and evaluate African History and the History of Sub Saharan Philosophy is something unique. This, however, depended on my ability to navigate the two worlds having primarily been educated in Africa in both Western Philosophical traditions and in Contemporary African philosophy.
I had an excellent experience of my PhD programme. My courses were interesting, my professors were supportive, engaging, and took me seriously, I had wonderful teaching opportunities. I had an excellent relationship with my supervisor and second reader. I set myself a goal and calendar of anticipated achievements and completed my dissertation in my expected time frame, and a few months before my funding wrapped up. I made a few lasting friendships.
Strong sense of community amongst graduate students. Good departmental support towards dissertation completion.
The other graduate students were very strong and very interested in figuring things out together. The teaching requirements were heavy, but the experience was invaluable, and there was a lot of support from other students. We had a variety of people explicitly pursuing a variety of career paths, but with genuine philosophical curiosity and ability.
Usually strong courses. Good opportunity for teaching experience.

66) University of Colorado Boulder

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Applied, Contemporary, Epistemology, Ethics, Gender/Feminist, Metaphysics, Political

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.9 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 2.2 teaching preparation (unsatisfied); 3.2 research preparation (neutral); 2.6 financial support (neutral); 3.5 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
55 total, 18 in permanent academic jobs, 5 in non-academic jobs (36% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
I would say the same thing about any philosophy department not ranked in the top 10. The reason is that they will almost certainly not get a tenure track job and it will ended up taking up 6-10 years of their life and only when they have to give up academia will they realize what a massive opportunity cost that actually is.
Most notable I think was that there was camaraderie among the grad students--we were friendly but also highly competitive. We taught a lot and shared info about teaching, talked about the papers we were working on and the courses we were taking. The faculty at the time we very accessible and supportive. [Potentially identifying information removed] but other faculty regularly met with my and read my dissertation as I wrote it and challenged me to do my best work. I worked with 4 different faculty members as a grader and TA and they were all great teachers and helped me develop important teaching skills. The graduate teacher program, including the teaching award, helped me get a TT job at a LAC, I think. We completed teaching workshops in philosophy and more general ones, had observations, created a teaching portfolio, etc. At that time, grad students were rarely encouraged to publish or attend conferences. I do not remember being encouraged to do so. I think that is more important today. We also regularly had invited talks from some of the best philosophers in the world. That really helped us to understand how professional philosophy was done.
The philosophy department at CU-Boulder is top-notch, and my advisor in particular, [name removed], was an invaluable resource. He helped make me a better philosopher and encouraged me to finish when things were difficult. Highly recommend.
The program which which I received my PhD does an exceptionally good job training its doctoral candidates to become excellent teachers. The program has a broad research emphasis that spans applied ethics, value theory, political philosophy, metaphysics and epistemology. Although its strengths and weaknesses lie in this respect have changed a good deal since I graduated, it remains in the top 30 on the strength of faculty research and standing in the profession. Guidance for graduate students in how to proceed to find productive, interesting work in academic philosophy is particularly good in this program. I recommend it without reservation.
There were climate issues, specifically gendered ones, that marred an otherwise excellent program. This is common in the discipline, and I have found that, in many philosophy departments, predatory men are often enabled to continue harming others at the cost of the safety, progress, and well-being of vulnerable and valuable members of the discipline. Ultimately, much was done to address this in my graduate program, but the problems run deeper than the available solutions.

67) Syracuse University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Contemporary, Early Modern, Ethics, Historical, Metaphysics

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.8 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 3.3 teaching preparation (neutral); 3.9 research preparation (satisfied); 3.6 financial support (satisfied); 3.4 program climate (neutral)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
42 total, 19 in permanent academic jobs, 7 in non-academic jobs (54% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
A very strong teacher training program, which provides a leg up when it comes to syllabus construction, assignment design, etc.
Commitment of faculty to success to students.
I received adequate guidance as to how to write publishable philosophy. On the downside, the department is not particularly prestigious. Given the apparent importance of prestige in the job market, I might recommend applying to a higher-ranked program.
The faculty were among the top in their field, excellent teachers and, perhaps most importantly, where always there to support students and do what they could to help them succeed as philosophers and on the job market. My fellow graduate students were brilliant and I learned so much from them every day. They also supported each other which made the experience much more pleasant than it otherwise would have been. The department funded conference attendance, and brought in countless amazing philosophers to give talks, which provided good networking opportunities for when one goes on the market.
The program provides grad students with vastly more teaching experience than most other programs, which I believe was helpful on the job market. I did not find the program to be supportive of women while I was there, but this seemed to be changing when I left and based on what I know has continued to improve since.

68) Florida State University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Ethics, Experimental Philosophy, History and Philosophy of Science, Metaphysics, Mind

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.8 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 2.9 teaching preparation (neutral); 3.1 research preparation (neutral); 3.6 financial support (satisfied); 4.1 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
44 total, 16 in permanent academic jobs, 11 in non-academic jobs (48% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Collegial atmosphere, professors are helpful and are trying to improve placement. Grad students friendly.
Excellent instruction in action theory, plenty of support from the department. My adviser goes above and beyond in helping me develop both philosophically and professionally. Unfortunately there is not all that much support from the school itself, though the graduate student union does help with that somewhat.
Friendly, social work environment and great faculty.
Really great faculty, very willing to take time for graduate students.

69) Tulane University

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.8 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
31 total, 8 in permanent academic jobs, 6 in non-academic jobs (32% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
I would only recommend the program to students who wished to study agency and responsibility or political philosophy.

70) University College London

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Epistemology, Mind, Political

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.8 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
45 total, 11 in permanent academic jobs, 3 in non-academic jobs (26% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Excellent, dedicated faculty. Small department, but in London so has access to a larger, wider philosophical scene.
Personally I received exemplary supervision, but this experience was not uniform across the department. The practice of students having different supervisors across their PhD meant that some students “slipped through the cracks” and ended up without a clear primary supervisor. I avoided this by sticking with the same supervisory team throughout. There was a good departmental culture amongst research students, but more could be done (and perhaps has been done since I graduated) to improve staff involvement in the research culture. There was, for example, no regular invited speaker series in the department, and the work in progress seminar was delivered and attended only by PhD students. The quality of teaching and research in the department is very high.
UCL has the benefits of being a medium-sized department where students can get to know most of the faculty, but is also part of the wider London philosophical scene with all that has to offer. The standard of both the graduate students and faculty is high.

71) University of Cambridge

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Ethics, Logic/Formal, Mind

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.8 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 4.0 teaching preparation (satisfied); 4.0 research preparation (satisfied); 3.2 financial support (neutral)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
71 total, 26 in permanent academic jobs, 13 in non-academic jobs (45% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Harder to get jobs in North America. Also, lack of teaching experience and corse work. But great program for people who know what they want to write about and Cambridge is a brilliant place to study.
Limited breadth of expertise across the discipline
The pluses: small, diverse, and friendly faculty, nice working environment, good resources; The minuses: very high profile PhD supervisors have less time for their students. I saw mine only every few months
There is an excellent group dynamic between the graduate students; everyone is working together, rather than competing.

72) Bowling Green State University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Applied, Bioethics/Medical Ethics, Ethics, Political

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.8 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 4.8 teaching preparation (very satisfied); 4.6 research preparation (very satisfied); 4.0 financial support (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
23 total, 10 in permanent academic jobs, 3 in non-academic jobs (50% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Faculty frequently come and go owing partly to the location (semi-rural Northern Ohio), but there has been a consistent revolving door of very strong faculty and there have been several dedicated faculty members who retain their positions for the length of their career. It is a major advantage, in my view, to have a program whose focus is ethics. In my time, the graduate students were a tight knit group that looked out for each other.
The training for teaching and actual employment was much better than other schools apparently as long term placement has been good. The cooperative environment between students and faculty is also excellent.
When I was in the program, there was a lot of emphasis put on practical applications of philosophy, including biomedical ethics, environmental ethics, and social and political philosophy. The program did a good job of making connections with the larger community. I also appreciated the fact that the department nurtured a strong sense of community among the graduate students in spite of our varied philosophical interests.

73) University of Chicago

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Ancient, Continental, Ethics, German, Historical, Interdisciplinary, Mind

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.8 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 3.8 teaching preparation (satisfied); 3.4 research preparation (neutral); 4.1 financial support (satisfied); 2.8 program climate (neutral)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
69 total, 30 in permanent academic jobs, 9 in non-academic jobs (50% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
A very good understanding of the systematic thought in historical philosophical figures and the relevance these thoughts still have. Some professors are just amazing people and a joy to work with. And there are many great fellow grad students who are friendly and who inspired me.
Chicago encourages its students to have broad interests. Chicago take the history of philosophy seriously, whilst also encouraging students to work in contemporary areas.
Education in Ancient and German Idealism is at the top of its field. Graduate student community is supportive and close knit.
Great faculty and a community with intense commitment to philosophical rigor and learning.
The professors are excellent philosophers and convey the significance of philosophy.
The program is unusual among North-American programs in its philosophical orientation and therefore suitable only for someone who is open to this. This fact may sometimes also have a negative impact on placement.

74) University of Miami

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Contemporary, Epistemology, Logic/Formal, Metaphysics, Mind

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.7 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
35 total, 17 in permanent academic jobs, 1 in non-academic jobs (50% placement rate)

75) Washington University in St. Louis

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Cognitive Science, Ethics, Interdisciplinary, Mind, Naturalist/Empirical

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.7 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 3.2 teaching preparation (neutral); 3.5 research preparation (satisfied); 4.4 financial support (satisfied); 3.8 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
37 total, 16 in permanent academic jobs, 7 in non-academic jobs (53% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
- Outstanding faculty in all major areas of the field - Supportive environment among faculty and students - Good funding, especially relative to the local cost of living
Extremely friendly department with close relationship between faculty and graduate students. Everyone is easily accessible and helpful. Always a lot of warm support.
Increasingly good community of grad students, and committed faculty mentors.
Likelihood of gaining good academic job placement after graduation is low, and requires spending multiple years as an adjunct, post doc, or visiting professor in most cases. That is a huge sacrifice to make. Academia is also not very hospitable to women who want to have children. It isn’t just they tenuous job market, but also how demanding the work is for women wary in their career. Women still end up doing way more unpaid planning work than their male counterparts. This doesn’t even include this still blatant sexism. I’ve reached the conclusion that academia is rarely a good career for many women. I would recommend for people who have a good backup support system either through their parents or spouses.
Nothing matters more than having a good adviser and I have been fortunate to have a really supportive one
Pros: great funding, great faculty, plenty of resources for doing empirically-informed philosophy, easy access to faculty; Cons: lots of undergrads in graduate classes, lack of structure in the grad program, lack of communication between faculty and grads en masse, no tight social structure, suboptimal blend of philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience
Rigorous courses that covered all areas of philosophy from ancients to meta-ethics. Accessible professors. No comprehensive exams were required, but we were required to write qualifying papers that prepared us for publishing and our dissertations.
Supportive professors who provide a great amount of time and attention in helping students develop their research; Generous financial funding and support; Formal and informal connections to other departments within institution and to other institutions; Supportive and non-combative relationships among graduate students; Healthy work-life balance
Although there are a few faculty members who are supportive of graduate students, the department as such does nothing to actively support them, and in general, faculty members are extremely critical of and discouraging towards the students. The approach is generally "sink or swim".

76) Michigan State University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Applied, Bioethics/Medical Ethics, Ethics, Gender/Feminist, Political

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.7 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 3.5 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
51 total, 19 in permanent academic jobs, 5 in non-academic jobs (41% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Highly regarded program, especially in my area of environmental philosophy. Pluralist faculty with wide-ranging expertise. Heavy emphasis on professionalization and placement.
I learned a lot from my program, but did not feel particularly guided by any of the faculty, and ended up doing the great majority of my work, and especially my dissertation, without significant oversight. I also found the faculty to be overworked, limiting their capacity to provide mentorship and insight into the profession and discipline.

77) University of Nebraska, Lincoln

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Epistemology, Ethics

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.7 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 3.6 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
24 total, 7 in permanent academic jobs, 5 in non-academic jobs (37% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
The quality of the instruction at UNL is great, the faculty members are very open and willing to discuss ideas, papers, etc. with students, and the grad-student environment is both supportive and inclusive.
Very soild training in the fundamentals in philosophy. The process towards the degree is rigorous. One will be ready for the job market, and the publishing market, and have a solid education in their specialization under their belt. This institution would be much more highly recognized for its excellence if it were on one of the coasts.

78) Emory University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Continental, Critical Theory, Gender/Feminist, Historical, Pluralist, Pragmatism

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.7 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 4.0 teaching preparation (satisfied); 3.4 research preparation (neutral); 4.8 financial support (very satisfied); 3.4 program climate (neutral)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
54 total, 26 in permanent academic jobs, 9 in non-academic jobs (58% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Excellent mentoring. My committee was amazing, as were many of the other faculty members I worked with. Pretty progressive department that let me choose an unusual dissertation topic (in cross-cultural philosophy). I did not feel compromised or pressured by any internal faculty politics. Great resources at the university for language training and conference travel, etc.
Excellent mentorship from prospective visit through job placement. Well-rounded, pluralist program that was receptive to my interdisciplinary (cross-cultural/East-West) project. Excellent University support for conference travel, research and training funding.
Great library, excellent financial resources. At the time I went this department was the best history of philosophy program in the country; that has changed, but I still think that the resources and brand recognition make it a good choice for graduate school.
I chose the program because of a strong financial aid package, the possibility of taking classes in other graduate disciplines, and because of its strength in the history of philosophy and the full breadth (including history) of continental philosophy. The program primarily placed people in teaching jobs when I was there, and was known for producing good teachers with a strong knowledge of the history of philosophy. It did a reasonably good job of preparing people for the job market and of giving them lots of teaching experience. Since I completed my degree, the program seems to have gone much further in the direction of contemporary continental philosophy, pragmatism, and philosophy of race and gender. There seems now to be much less emphasis on this history of philosophy and on breadth of philosophical training, and almost no coverage of analytic philosophy or “core” areas as seen from an analytic perspective (there was at least some coverage of these sorts of things when I was there, though I had to learn them largely on my own). This might be a positive or a negative, depending on the graduate student’s interests, but it does strike me as a potential drawback given the current job market. I’m not sure if that reputation still holds—at least with regard to the history of philosophy part. And in that respect, I would hesitate somewhat to recommend the program to prospective graduate students, as it seems to me that most teaching schools are still looking primarily to hire historically trained generalists, rather than specialists in race and gender theory and contemporary “cutting edge” continental theory.
I was given a broad training in the history of philosophy as well as various areas of contemporary philosophy. The faculty challenged students to think across traditions. There were many opportunities to present graduate student work and support for traveling to present work at conferences.
This is a very pluralistic department in which students have the opportunity of exploring and expanding their knowledge in ways other departments do not allow. It has an excellent and truly committed and supportive faculty. The program is incredibly well organized. It offers a perfect balance between the training of students as researchers and as teachers.
When I entered my program in 2006, it was quite pluralistic, but with an emphasis on history of philosophy. Starting in 2009, the department turned decidably toward contemporary continental philosophy, with a faculty turnover of 50% within three years. Students working in broadly analytic or historical fields were left to their own devices. I was fortunate enough to make connections with faculty in other departments, but those who were not so fortunate had a very difficult time completing or finding employment. Today the department is still admitting students interested in pursuing historical work, but they are largely without support.

79) Brown University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Ethics, Mind, Political

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.7 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 2.8 teaching preparation (neutral); 3.2 research preparation (neutral); 4.0 financial support (satisfied); 3.7 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
31 total, 10 in permanent academic jobs, 8 in non-academic jobs (43% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
The fellow students are supportive and the faculty is available and happy to meet and talk with their students.
There was no competition between graduate students. It is a small program so you get to know the faculty. Not a high teaching load. A very livable city. Faculty was generally nice to grad students and to each other. There wasn’t much professional development and a mismatch between faculty understanding of the job market and market realities. Not much gender or racial diversity.

80) Stony Brook University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Continental, Critical Theory, Gender/Feminist, French, Historical, Phenomenology

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.7 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 3.5 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
63 total, 32 in permanent academic jobs, 10 in non-academic jobs (60% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Great professors, always available, caring about students.

81) Duke University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Biology, Cognitive Science, Interdisciplinary, Naturalist/Empirical

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.6 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 3.8 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
37 total, 15 in permanent academic jobs, 4 in non-academic jobs (45% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Demanding curriculum; close mentoring
Duke was a small, friendly community that was interdisciplinary to such a degree that it permeated every interaction. The right kind of student - one who is not hyper competitive but broadly interested - would thrive there.
Excellent mentor
Financial support; Ample opportunities (conference, academic centers, training for teaching etc.) Friendly and supportive atmosphere; Academic support (availability of faculty members); Support for everyday life (including family caring)
Nurturing and supportive relationships with faculty. Challenging and well structured program. Opportunities for inter-disciplinary collaboration.
The program was not too big. It was easy to meet with professors. There was lots of research support available without much footwork. Good stipend. Living costs were very manageable. Not too distracting in terms of city amenities to get work done. Proximity of UNC Chapel Hill made for a larger / expanded cohort and other faculty to meet with occasionally.
There are a few subjects that our faculty are very specialized in. We also offer unique collaborative/interdisciplinary opportunities. For a student who would clearly benefit from those opportunities and who would be unlikely to find them elsewhere, I would encourage them to apply to our program. .

82) Villanova University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Ancient, Continental, Critical Theory, Early Modern, Gender/Feminist, French, German, Historical, Phenomenology, Political

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.6 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 4.8 teaching preparation (very satisfied); 3.8 research preparation (satisfied); 2.8 financial support (neutral); 3.5 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
56 total, 24 in permanent academic jobs, 10 in non-academic jobs (52% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
I was a non-traditional student with an established career outside of philosophy. My interests in my PhD program were personal not professional. My career has continued outside of philosophy since completing my PhD.
It has changed dramatically. It was an excellent PhD program in Continental Philosophy, now it is more of a hodge-podge of various philosophical disciplines. So it has weakened what I took to be its greatest strength.
It was a collegial program with supportive faculty.
My program has a poor placement record and does not have a significant pedigree/reputation to be appealing to hiring committees. In addition, my program does not train students to be communicative in the major or mainstream approaches to philosophy, so students are left without being able to communicate their own work to others.
Strong mentorship program - both for teaching and research; Generous travel funding; Faculty deeply invested in grad student success; One of the top programs in the US for Continental Philosophy
The program emphasized teaching in the history of philosophy, which made me competitive for positions at Catholic universities. Faculty were invested in the grad students and I received a great deal of travel funding in addition to my stipend.
The program is characterized by leading-edge researchers, commitment to mentoring graduate students and to professional development.
The program is unique in emphasizing the history of philosophy alongside continental philosophy. The program also boasts a strong student community.
Villanova is strong in continental philosophy, critical theory broadly, philosophy of religion, political philosophy, feminism, and has excellent faculty in many other particular fields. Support for graduate students to travel is readily available. The faculty range from early to late career but are generally very active publishers, etc. The student body is generally very diverse, with women, minorities, and international students strongly represented and supported. The students are generally active in conference organization, organizing gatherings, and attending events, whether on campus or in Philadelphia.

83) University of British Columbia

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Aesthetics, Analytic, Epistemology, History and Philosophy of Science, Mind

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.6 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
26 total, 10 in permanent academic jobs, 3 in non-academic jobs (43% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Great faculty in the philosophy of mind, supportive environment for graduate students, decent funding.
Great faculty--great philosophers, very supportive of students; Very fluid boundaries between disciplines, allowing me to work heavily with faculty and other grad students in the psychology department; Strong graduate students, good community
I received great instruction, and a lot of advice and guidance. Also, I had excellent opportunities to work with people in the psychology department and the faculty in philosophy were very encouraging and supportive of this.

84) University of Texas at Austin

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Ancient, Epistemology, Language, Logic/Formal, Mind

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.5 overall rating (somewhat likely to recommend); 2.8 teaching preparation (neutral); 3.2 research preparation (neutral); 2.2 financial support (unsatisfied); 3.3 program climate (neutral)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
57 total, 24 in permanent academic jobs, 8 in non-academic jobs (49% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Great place to learn: excellent, available faculty and good grad student community. I would advise female prospective students to discuss the climate for women with current female students and faculty. My impression is that there are no current problems, but there have been in the past.
I had a very supportive supervisor and fantastic academic resources in my area (mind and language). Many other students worked on related things and were up for socialising and talking shop often. Austin was a relatively affordable, very fun city to live in.
Large department, rigorous program.
Limited employment prospects given UT Austin is not a top 10 philosophy program
My experience at UT has been positive as a result of the sense of collegiality and collaborative community here. I feel safe to ask questions that might seem remedial, but I also know I will be challenged. The faculty and staff are generally warm and willing to help. The faculty are generous with their time. And I have formed some of my closest friendships from my graduate student colleagues.
My program was on the cusp of being a top program with a strong placement rate. Roughly half of graduates each year entered a tenure track job or a decent postdoc. I would recommend the program to foreigners with job prospects in their home countries, to women, and to Hispanic or African American applicants. I would not recommend the program to white men but instead would encourage them to either enter a top 5 program or pursue a different career. White men with publications regularly failed to secure tenure track employment or decent postdocs. There were many older professors who did not understand the difficulty of the job market, did not advocate for their students with sufficient vigor on the job market, and sometimes offered bad or outdated advice about the job market. Many of these professors are retiring soon, however. The program let bad and unmotivated students linger too long, working as TAs, graders, and instructors. More students should have been pushed out of the program with a masters after the second or third year.
Not a lot of support from faculty, especially with respect to professionalization.
Rampant sexual harassment, sexism, and harassment apology. [Potentially identifying information removed] who not only has a history of harassment but who actively protects and promotes known harassers.
Texas provides top-notch training in cutting-edge analytic philosophy, and does so with a no-holds-barred, old-school, argument-based approach. It was a sink-or-swim environment, with a high attrition rate. But those who made it through the program became good philosophers and did well on the job market. Also, the city itself is a great place to live (aside from the summers). I really valued my time there.
The department is pretty hands off with just about every aspect of the PhD program.
The department is rigorous and demanding and I felt like I got very high quality training as a researcher. Austin is also a very desirable place to live and (relatively) affordable (at least as compared to major US cities). The department is also very strong in the areas of my research and so there were many faculty members to talk to and other students working in related areas. During the years I was a student there was also a very vibrant and happy student community.
The graduate student stipends are less than a living wage and there is no pay over the summers. The department is very disorganized; there do not seem to be any established rules/procedures for important things (like the assignment of advisers to new graduate students, for example). Things only seem to happen when a faculty member notices that something should be done and cares enough to make a fuss about it.
There are a number of known serial harassers and assaulters. I had personal experience of harassment and assault with four of them. The name of one, [name removed], is now public due to University sanctions. [Potentially identifying information removed] knows about all of the predators and protects them for the sake of department rankings. There are almost no women or professors of color on the faculty. There are no women of color on faculty. The department is extraordinarily hostile to anyone who is not a white man. Pretty much only logic and philosophy language are taken seriously. There is no transparency in departmental decision-making regarding TAships, fellowships, or awards. It is a horrible place that shows no signs of getting better.

85) Fordham University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Ancient, Continental, Epistemology, Ethics, French, Historical, Medieval, Phenomenology, Pluralist

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.4 overall rating (neither likely nor unlikely to recommend); 4.5 teaching preparation (very satisfied); 3.4 research preparation (neutral); 4.1 financial support (satisfied); 3.6 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
66 total, 26 in permanent academic jobs, 20 in non-academic jobs (57% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
-Collegiality among professors and graduate students. -Solid background in the history of philosophy that prepared me for teaching.
Genuinely pluralistic across historical traditions and contemporary philosophical methods. Excellent preparation for teaching and ample experience designing and delivering introductory courses autonomously
I thought at the time it was a good program especially for students interested in studying 19th century or 20th century continental philosophy. Since then several key faculty members in that area have changed, so I would probably lower my recommendation. It also has strengths in medieval philosophy.
My department has a very broad view of the philosophical canon, offering courses in ancient, medieval, modern, contemporary continental, contemporary analytic, pragmatist, feminist, and occasionally Asian traditions. There is no type of philosophy that is not taken seriously. Though there are certainly some gaps in the strengths of the program, such as in mathematics, non-western, and Islamic traditions, support is provided for just about any type of project. The emphasis on good teaching preparation and language skills is greater than I have seen in other departments.
Pluralistic department strong on the history of philosophy and supportive of collaboration across specializations.
strong training in the history of philosophy
The philosophy faculty at Fordham is of the highest quality. All professors that I studied with were highly regarded in their areas of specialization. But they were also very invested in helping students develop as professional philosophers. I never had the impression that their primary focus was publishing and teaching was secondary. Rather they attended to both aspects of their profession with the highest integrity.
Very healthy departmental culture. Warm and welcoming environment, with lots of academic and social support. Wide range of AOS in faculty and students.

86) University of Hawai'i at Mānoa

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Aesthetics, Asian, Gender/Feminist, Islamic, Non-Western, Pluralist, Pragmatism

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.4 overall rating (neither likely nor unlikely to recommend); 3.9 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
34 total, 18 in permanent academic jobs, 3 in non-academic jobs (58% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
A unique program and the global leader for specialties in non-western and comparative philosophy. Home of the journals "Philosophy East and West" and "Journal of Chinese Philosophy." Students can learn about Chinese, Japanese, Indian, Arabic philosophies, as well as traditional subjects in western philosophy.
High Job Placement Rate
My PhD program is one of the few in the United States that offers robust training in South and East Asian philosophies. As the discipline of philosophy seeks to diversify, this training is increasingly important.
Supportive atmosphere. Variety of sources of financial support. Broad and inclusive curriculum.
The curriculum is surprisingly narrow. Senior professors tend to be ignorant, or categorically dismissive, of scholarship in other fields. In addition, the funding situation for graduate students is atrocious and, frankly, immoral.
The faculty in Asian philosophy was strong when I was a graduate student in the department. Budget cuts have resulted in a serious decline in numbers of faculty and graduate students. There was no expert in my areas of specialization at the time, but I was able to navigate the program to accommodate my interests.
UH has to offer one of the very few graduate programs in philosophy where students have access to a number of excellent specialists on non-western philosophy.
Unique department history and dynamics make it exceptionally well situated for graduate training in inter-cultural comparative philosophy.

87) The New School

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Continental, Critical Theory, German, Historical, Phenomenology, Political

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.4 overall rating (neither likely nor unlikely to recommend); 3.3 teaching preparation (neutral); 3.7 research preparation (satisfied); 2 financial support (unsatisfied); 4.1 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
87 total, 26 in permanent academic jobs, 4 in non-academic jobs (31% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Insecure funding is the main reason I would not recommend the department.
It depends on what areas of study a prospective student wished to pursue and on available funding.

88) Boston University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Ancient, Continental, Early Modern, Ethics, German, Historical, History and Philosophy of Science, Phenomenology, Pluralist

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.4 overall rating (neither likely nor unlikely to recommend); 3.9 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
48 total, 26 in permanent academic jobs, 1 in non-academic jobs (55% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
Boston University provided a pluralistic graduate curriculum, and I have definitely benefitted from the broad knowledge base that I gained there. The faculty were on the whole very supportive.
BU has significant strengths in the philosophy of science, German philosophy, and the history of philosophy broadly construed. They have several faculty members who are actively publishing, and have co-authored articles with numerous graduate students.
Excellent teachers in both knowledge and character. Diverse specialties within the Western tradition (has both substantial continental and analytic philosophers or even those that do both), friendly atmosphere, close to other universities (easy to find people who share similar interests), etc.
Good ambiance among the students; great academic environment in the area; faculty not always committed to or supportive of graduate students
I would marked "definitely would recommend" above if I were certain that the current program is similar to how it was when I attended. The professors were very supportive and very available to grad students. Moreover, they were serious scholars who modeled what the ideal academic life would look like. The program was rigorous, but in a way that fostered community among the students. I had a very positive experience.

89) University of South Florida

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Ancient, Continental, Early Modern, Ethics, Gender/Feminist, Historical, History and Philosophy of Science, Phenomenology

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.4 overall rating (neither likely nor unlikely to recommend); 3.8 program climate (satisfied)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
74 total, 22 in permanent academic jobs, 10 in non-academic jobs (34% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
All of us were treated as if we were apprentices, learning how to be professional philosophers, from the very beginning. We were placed in a rigorous Pro-Seminar that exposed us to the various areas of specialization of the faculty at USF. Every single professor in the program, most especially the [name removed] and the team of Continental Historians of Philosophy, was wonderful. We were assigned TAships from the beginning, but were soon pushed out of the nest to start teaching our own stand alone courses. This proved invaluable as I went on the job market before completion of my Ph.D. and landed a job based on my experience teaching. They were very smart to emphasize that USF offered itself as a History of Philosophy program, with attendant expertise in each epoch of World History.
Departmental in fighting, poor placement record, unsupportive environment, just not a well regarded program. Only go if you don’t have a choice and only then if they really pay you.
I found the department at USF chaotic, unsupportive and laden with unreasonable requirements (two languages other than English and 120 graduate hours.) Placement potential is weak. Many top students ended up without offers or unwilling to accept poor positions in Timbuktu. About half of students admitted end up outside of the academy. If you can go somewhere else, you should.
I was able to not only pursue my philosophical interests (theoretical and applied ethics) in the Philosophy Dept towards two masters [potentially identifying information removed], but also pursue course work and independent study in the Business school at USF.
My doctoral program trained me in the history of philosophy and in a wide range of contemporary issues, making me extremely marketable as compared to others who specialize heavily in one sub-discipline.
My Philosophy faculty advisor encouraged my participation in taking Business graduate courses towards a two prong approach to my PhD Philosophy studies so that my focus was on applied and theoretical aspects of each discipline regarding ethics.
The department produces too many phds in a market where there is not enough jobs already. Given the ranking and reputation of the department they cannot place most of them to a position that would require a phd in philosophy, hence doing a disservice to students.
The faculty was always available to mentor.
The program offered a good breadth of topics, while giving individuals the opportunity encouraged individuals to pursue particular research topics. Most important, there were multiple excellent mentoring opportunities, so long as individuals took the initiative and maintained effort.
There was very little professional development and support for student research that resulted in publication. The class that all graduate students register for that is supposed to support pedagogical and professional development is a joke, and class is never held. There are close to no discussions about life on the market, and the department does very little to support students seeking employment both within academia and beyond. Finally, the average award stipend is not sufficient for graduate students to live on and they often take multiple jobs, which further hinders their professional development and success.
While I received a generous university stipend, many students in my grad program received half or one-third stipends (e.g., $6K/year + waiver). In my opinion, this is not enough for students to live on, let alone support research endeavors/travel necessary to succeed in contemporary academia. In short, there was far too little equitable and regular support within the department for most students. Furthermore, there was rampant nepotism on the part of [potentially identifying information removed]. It was well known (among students) that students working with professors [potentially identifying information removed] did not "like" were "punished" with less than ideal teaching opportunities, were not extended more time to degree, and were not offered post-degree positions, whereas those students working with [potentially identifying information removed] received coveted RAships [potentially identifying information removed], given more support (time to degree, supplemental teaching, post-graduate positions), etc. I was lucky insofar as I had a strong network outside of my department, had university funds that did not come under the discretion of [potentially identifying information removed], and had mentors that were willing to help me to the finish line.
You won’t get a better history of philosophy education elsewhere (especially medieval and early modern). That’s not to say there aren’t equally good programs, but some of the very best faculty are here and those faculty are all decent human beings who care about the graduate students as whole persons. Compared to other Florida PhD granting programs (even those with higher US News and Philosophical Gourmet rankings) USF is consistently competitive in placement, if not the highest. The job market is bad for everyone in the discipline, and it’s a large enough program where there are also some students who don’t (or for personal reasons were not able to) put in the effort to be competitive in an awful market, but those aren’t a measure of the program. To some degree you get out of it what you put into it. I only wouldn’t recommend it more strongly because prestige bias is a well known factor in job placement and ultimately academia isn’t a meritocracy. Yet several people succeed in spite of that, which speaks to the program’s quality. Others actively chose to leave academia after their degree for a variety of healthy reasons.

90) Western University

Keywords chosen by past graduates/current students:
Analytic, Bioethics/Medical Ethics, Cognitive Science, Ethics, History and Philosophy of Science, Logic/Formal, Physics, Political

Average program ratings by graduates 2011 and later or current students:
3.4 overall rating (neither likely nor unlikely to recommend); 2.6 teaching preparation (neutral); 3.7 research preparation (satisfied); 2.7 financial support (neutral)

Job placement of graduates 2011 and later:
92 total, 17 in permanent academic jobs, 24 in non-academic jobs (25% placement rate)

Student Comments on Program Overall:
4 years is an inadequate time for all but the most privileged of students to have a reasonable chance of competing. Claims to the contrary are disingenuous at best, and maliciously manipulative at worst to prospective students.
After finishing my MA (at an institution that has historical and ongoing climate issues) it was incredibly important for me to find a place where I felt like people like me could do work like I do, and be not only left alone, but supported. I have that here. Though the department is far from perfect (it is professional philosophy after all), I find that there is a generally good climate for those of us who are not cis-hetero white men in the discipline.
Funding very low; Program short (4 years); No possibility of teaching your own course; Exceptionally good environment for philosophy of science (Rotman Institute of Philosophy and faculty members)
If I only had to evaluate my program based on the people I have met, what I have learned and the overall support I received from faculty members I worked with, I would highly recommend my program, especially in my area. However, the finances and length of the program have generated so much stress and obstacles that it clearly has taken over my otherwise grateful look at my department. Being paid way below the poverty line, having no other incomes available from the university and having my scholarships taken away from me by the university to pay for my tuitions have generated very important difficulties that clearly have affected both my experience and my work, and my vision of the academic world.
It is a very strong program that excellently trains PhD students in all aspects of the job -- research, teaching, and service. The program has a good placement rate, and when its alumni are hired, they hit the ground running because of the excellent training. However, I selected "somewhat likely" rather than "definitely would recommend" because of climate issues in the department that have made the program somewhat inhospitable for women.
Lack of employment opportunities; Length of time to secure stable employment; Lack of control over where you live and work
The department was very fractured, with faculty disputes negatively impacting graduate students. Many faculty seemed deeply unhappy in their jobs, which made generating excitement about research difficult. There was very little mentoring support, and students were left to their own devices to figure out how to move forward in the field. Success of graduate students seemed very dependent on how seriously their advisors happened to take mentorship. This made it really hard for everyone, even those of us with supportive advisors.
The program at UWO was extremely supportive. The faculty were intent on getting you through the program, rather than attempting to weed people out. There was also a great deal of support amongst the graduate students (reading each other’s work, study groups, socializing, etc.). Overall it was a great experience.